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DROP The Los Angeles County Food DROP Program
Mission: To provide resources for businesses operating in the County Unincorporated Communities so that they may (1) safely donate their excess edible food to fight hunger, and (2) reduce food waste in Los Angeles County.
Vision: All food service businesses operating in the Los Angeles County Unincorporated Communities safely donate their excess edible food to feed people in need in Los Angeles County.


Why Donate?


HELP FIGHT HUNGER

Each year, the Los Angeles County Unincorporated Communities toss 128,000 tons of food into the trash. Meanwhile, approximately 1 in 7 individuals are food insecure (lacking regular access to quality nutritious meals). Working with other County departments, the Department of Public Works has partnered up with local charities to offer businesses a food donation option through Food DROP.

ASSEMBLY BILL 1826

Under AB 1826, businesses that generate specified amounts of organic waste are required to arrange for organic waste recycling services and/or donate their excess edible food.

SENATE BILL 1383

Under SB 1383, the State set the goal that not less than 20 percent of edible food that is currently disposed of is recovered for human consumption by 2025.

TAX DEDUCTIBLE

All businesses that donate food to a 501(c)(3) for the care of the ill, the needy, or infants can receive an enhanced tax deduction.


How to Safely Donate


FOOD DONATION TOOLKIT

Explore our tools below to learn about (a) state legislation regarding organic waste diversion and food donation; (b) Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’s food safety guidelines; (c) find an interactive map of our food recovery partners; (d) refer to our Food DROP brochure for a quick overview of our program; and (e) download and use our tracking form to record all of your business’ food donations.

Fact Sheets
(a)
Safety Guidelines
(b)
Food Recovery Agencies
(c)
Food DROP Brochure
(d)
Tracking Form
(e)


You’re Protected!


Did you know that food facilities that donate any food to a nonprofit charitable organization for human consumption is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from that consumption of the donated food, unless the injury resulted from negligence or a willful act? Read more below:

California Health and Safety Code, Section 114432(a)

A person, gleaner, or food facility may donate food to a food bank or to any other nonprofit charitable organization for distribution to persons free of charge. Food facilities may donate food directly to end recipients for consumption.

California Health and Safety Code, Section 114433

No food facility that donates food as permitted by Section 114432 shall be subject to civil or criminal liability or penalty for violation of any laws, regulations, or ordinances regulating the labeling or packaging of the donated product or, with respect to any laws, regulations, or ordinances, for a violation occurring after the time of donation.

California Civil Code, Section 1714.25(a)

Except for injury resulting from gross negligence or intentional misconduct in the preparation or handling of donated food, no person, gleaner, or food facility that donates food that is fit for human consumption at the time it was donated to a nonprofit charitable organization or food bank shall be liable for any damage or injury resulting from the consumption of the donated food. Food facilities may donate food directly to end recipients for consumption.

United States Code, Bill Emerson Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, Title 42, Chapter 13A, Section 1791(c)(I)

A person or gleaner shall not be subject to civil or criminal liability arising from the nature, age, packaging, or condition of apparently wholesome food or an apparently fit grocery product that the person or gleaner donates in good faith to a nonprofit organization for ultimate distribution to needy individuals.

Assembly Bill 1219 (Eggman, 2017), California Good Samaritan Food Donation Act

Existing law specifies that a food facility that donates any food that is fit for human consumption at the time it was donated to a nonprofit charitable organization or a food bank is not liable for any damage or injury resulting from the consumption of the donated food, unless the injury resulted from negligence or a willful act in the preparation or handling of the donated food.

This bill, the California Good Samaritan Food Donation Act, would expand these provisions to persons and gleaners who donate food, as defined. The bill would narrow the exception to protection from liability to injury resulting from gross negligence or intentional misconduct. The bill would specify that the immunity from civil liability provided by these provisions applies to the donation of food that is fit for human consumption and that has exceeded the labeled shelf life date recommended by the manufacturer, provided, in instances of perishable food, the person that distributes the food to the end recipient makes a good faith evaluation that the food is wholesome. The bill would authorize food facilities to donate food directly to end recipients for consumption.

Start Donating!


Use our Find a Recycler tool to find a food recovery and/or redistribution organization near you! Check out our Food Donation Toolkit. It will help you track your food donations and your inventory! You can also request a consultation from us to help you set up a safe food donation process at your location. Download our Food Donation Tracking Form to help you track your food donations and review your inventory.


Food Recipients


Thank you for being a Los Angeles County Food DROP partner. Use our Received Food Donation Tracking Form to keep track of the food donations you receive. By the end of each month, please upload a copy of this completed form here.

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