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District Overview

District 21, Kagel Canyon

Date Established: December 9, 1935

Los Angeles County Waterworks District 21, Kagel Canyon, is a special district formed in accordance with Division 16, Sections 55000 through 55991 of the State Water Code to supply drinking water for urban use in Kagel Canyon. The District is operated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, Waterworks Division and is governed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

The District was established in December of 1935 and began to operate in May 1937. The water system was once owned by the Suburban Mutual Water Company which was a privately-owned water system that operated under the jurisdiction of the Public Utilities Commission. The District was organized through the efforts of residents in Kagel Canyon who were dissatisfied with the operations of the private water company. The District currently serves approximately 600 people through 250 metered connections. The District receives its water through an interagency agreement with the cities of Glendale and Los Angeles. The City of Glendale provides groundwater to the City of Los Angeles in exchange for the City of Los Angeles providing the District with a connection to their water system which is located at the south end of the District.

The District has two main sources: General Fund and Accumulative Capital Outlay (ACO) Fund. The General Fund revenues are primarily from water sales and are used to pay for administration, operation, and maintenance costs. The ACO Fund revenues are primarily from standby charges and surcharges and are used to pay for the replacement and upgrade of old and undersized water system infrastructure.

District 29, Malibu and Topanga

Date Established: September 29, 1959

Los Angeles County Waterworks District 29, Malibu, is a special district formed in accordance with Division 16, Sections 55000 through 55991 of the State Water Code to supply drinking water for urban use in Malibu and Topanga. The District is operated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, Waterworks Division and is governed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

The District was established in 1959 by a public election that authorized the formation of the District. The water systems in the Topanga and East Malibu Mesa areas were installed during the years from 1962 to 1967. The water systems in the East Malibu Coastal region and areas westerly of Las Flores Canyon Road were installed during the years from 1928 to 1970. After the construction of the major transmission line along Pacific Coast Highway that delivers water from Metropolitan Water District (MWD) to Malibu, Topanga, and Marina del Rey, the District was petitioned to purchase several nearby mutual and privately owned water companies. The District purchased Hillside Water Company in 1967 and Malibu Water Company in 1971. The District currently serves approximately 22,000 people through 7,500 metered connections. The District purchases nearly 100 percent of its water supply from MWD through an intermediary wholesaler, the West Basin Municipal Water District.

The District has two main sources of funding: General Fund and Accumulative Capital Outlay (ACO) Fund. The General Fund revenues are primarily from water sales and are used for the administration, operation, and maintenance of the District’s water system. The ACO Fund revenues are primarily from standby charges and surcharges and are used for the replacement and upgrade of old and undersized water system infrastructure.

Marina del Rey Water System

Date Established: 1962

The Marina del Rey water system was formed in 1962 in accordance with the Joint Powers Agreement pursuant to Section 55333 of the State Water Code.

In early 1960, the Department of Small Craft Harbors conducted a study recommending the full transfer of the administration and operation of the Marina del Rey Water System to the Waterworks District Joint Fund. The Chief Administrative Officer and County Counsel concurred with the recommendation.

In May 24, 1960, the Waterworks District entered an agreement with the County of Los Angeles to deliver water to the boundary of Marina del Rey through the construction of a service connection and water main which delivers water from MWD.

Since 1962, the Waterworks District Joint Fund has provided, by contract, the maintenance and operation of the County-owned water system at the Marina del Rey Small Craft Harbor.

The Marina del Rey water system currently serves approximately 8,800 people through 300 metered connections. Majority of the water supply is purchased through District 29. The system can also obtain water through two emergency interconnections with the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP).

The Marina del Rey Water System has two main sources of funding: General Fund and Accumulative Capital Outlay (ACO) Fund. The General Fund revenues are primarily from water sales to the lessees in Marina del Rey and is used to pay for the administration, operation, and maintenance of the water system. The ACO Fund revenues are primarily from long term debt proceeds and water sales and are used to pay for the replacement and upgrade of old and undersized water system infrastructure.

District 36, Val Verde

Date Established: August 13, 1963

Los Angeles County Waterworks District 36, Val Verde, is a special district formed in accordance with Division 16, Sections 55000 through 55991 of the State Water Code to supply drinking water for urban use in Val Verde. The District is operated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, Waterworks Division and is governed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

The local water system of the District was installed in 1963 using a federally assisted County Improvement Assessment District which was also paid for by the local property owners. The imported water supply connection with Castaic Lake Water Agency was funded by County Block Grant Housing and Community Development Act (HCDA) funds. The District currently serves approximately 5,200 people through 1,300 metered connections. The District’s water supply is composed of imported water purchased from Castaic Lake Water Agency and groundwater from one well pumping from the Saugus formation beneath the District’s service area.

The District has two main sources of funding: General Fund and Accumulative Capital Outlay (ACO) Fund. The General Fund revenues are primarily from water sales and are used to pay for the administration, operation, and maintenance of the District’s water system. The ACO Fund revenues are primarily from standby charges and surcharges and are used to pay for the replacement of old and undersized water system infrastructure.

District 37, Acton

Date Established: August 13, 1963

Los Angeles County Waterworks District 37, Acton, is a special district formed in accordance with Division 16, Sections 55000 through 55991 of the State Water Code to supply drinking water for urban use in Acton. The District is operated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, Waterworks Division and is governed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

The original water system was installed in 1963 by the District using general obligation bonds and a Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Water and Sewer Grant. Subsequent additions were financed by developers requesting extensions of service to their properties. The District currently serves approximately 6,500 people through 1,400 metered connections. The District’s water supply is primarily groundwater pumped from three wells owned and operated by the District and is supplemented by imported water from the State Water Project which is treated at AVEK’s Acton Water Treatment Plant.

The District has two main sources of funding: General Fund and Accumulative Capital Outlay (ACO) Fund. The General Fund revenues are primarily from water sales and are used to pay for the administration, operation, and maintenance of the District’s water system. The ACO Fund revenues are primarily from standby and capital improvement charges and are used to pay for the replacement and upgrade of old and undersized water system infrastructure.

District 40, Antelope Valley

Date Established: November 2, 1993

Los Angeles County Waterworks District 40, Antelope Valley, is a special District formed in accordance with Division 16, Sections 55000 through 55991 of the State Water Code to supply drinking water for urban use in the Antelope Valley. The District is operated by the Los Angeles County Department of Public Works, Waterworks Division and is governed by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

The District is comprised of eight regions serving customers in the cities of Lancaster and Palmdale, and the unincorporated communities of Pearblossom, Littlerock, Sun Village, Rock Creek, Northeast Los Angeles County, and Lake Los Angeles. The first region formed was Lancaster in 1919 and the last region formed was Rock Creek in 1968. The various regions were consolidated into a single district on November 2, 1993. The District currently serves approximately 206,000 people through 55,600 metered connections. The District’s water supply is purchased from Antelope Valley East Kern Water Agency and is supplemented by groundwater pumped from the Antelope Valley Groundwater Basin by approximately 54 wells owned and operated by the District.

The District has two main sources of funding: General Fund and Accumulative Capital Outlay (ACO) Fund. The General Fund revenues are primarily from water sales and are used to pay for the administration, operation, and maintenance of the District’s water system. The ACO Fund revenues are primarily from standby charges, surcharges, and capital improvement charges and are used to pay for the replacement and upgrade of old and undersized water system infrastructure.


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